Autor Tópico: Ajustando o AF na Sony :)  (Lida 1625 vezes)

Pictus

  • Trade Count: (3)
  • Referência
  • *****
  • Mensagens: 9.109
  • Sexo: Masculino
    • http://www.flickr.com/photos/10986424@N02/sets/
Online: 22 de Abril de 2008, 17:22:22
 :ponder:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1037&message=27659536

I can help with the back focus. I did the repair on my 5D and it was
simple. The way the focus works in all the Sony and Maxxum DSLR cameras
is not from information on the main sensor but rather a second sensor on
the floor of the mirror chamber. (see Sony explanation re a350 live
view). The focusing sensor is mounted on a platform that can be adjusted
up or down by turning some set screws. It is fed part of the light path
by a second mirror mounted under the main mirror. So by adjusting the
set screws you can raise or lower the platform. That brings the focus
sensor closer or father away from the back of the lens. It is a simple
and predictable system.

OK now you understand the focus scheme and what is not correct and needs
to be adjusted. The three set screws can be reached thru the bottom of
the camera. If you look at the tripod mount hole you will see a rubbery
removable plate. Pry it up and remove it. Don’t touch the sticky stuff
that will hold it in place when you replace it. Don’t’ scratch anything
(achievable with care). The three set screws are under it.

They require a 1.5 mm Allen wrench to adjust. Those can be found in any
hardware store. OK, so which way to turn them and how much? IMPORTANT:
you should always turn all the screws the same rotational amount. That
will keep the plate perpendicular to the light path. It is said that
clockwise rotation will improve backfocus (BF) and most people state use
1/4 turn. If you have front focus (FF) use counterclockwise adjustment -
but remember each the same angular amount.

You should use a 1.4 or 1.7 lens wide opened to get the smallest depth
of field (DOF). In that way you can tell if the adjustment is correct as
the image will be sharp or blurred. If not sharp go back and turn the
screws clockwise for BF or counterclockwise if you have FF. When you
have it adjusted correctly things will be very very sharp wide open.

It will take some more time if you want it to be precision. You will
have to net the error in exactly over several tries. But it is worth the
extra effort.

I waited 2 years to do the adjustment because I was timid and concerned
about damaging the camera. That is just plain Malarkey and I don’t
believe it voids the warranty. It is just an adjustment procedure and
has no more effect on voiding your warranty than adjusting your F stop
or changing lenses.

The bottom line for me was after doing this in a precision manner the
camera astounded me. The sharpness of the 1.4 lens is beyond belief at
1.4 and gets better as you go to smaller apertures. Almost all the web
sites that test the 50mm 1.4 including Photozine and others, report that
the Minolta-Sony 1.4 has the highest resolution of all the 50mm lenses
out there and that is wide opened at 1.4. But if you can't focus it
correctly it is worthless. Go to Photozine and look at the resolution
figures for yourself and note that the Minolta-Sony beats the Nikon.

Some will say, send it to Sony and don't be a fool as you will damage
the camera and void your warranty. I am sure that Sony can damage the
camera as well as shipping can cause damage. Both of those will outweigh
the chance that you will cause permanent harm. That is unless you are
the equivalent of a bull elephant in heat in a China shop. Anyway the
repair personelle couldn't give a hoot if you adjusted it, as they get
paid for the repair whether it is under warranty or not and they know
the problem exists.

Roosevelt said we have nothing to fear but fear itself. If you do the
adjustment yourself you will get it absolutely right. If you send it to
Sony they may get it right but more likely will not get it exactly
right. You can do a better job on this than they can because you can
devote more time and effort to making it exactly right. After all it
came misadjusted from the factory in the first place.

When focusing, while doing your tests, do not focus on things that go at
an angle. Focus dead head on, on your subject. The reason is that the
pick up area for the spot is larger than the square in your viewfinder
and is not always exactly in registration. That will cause focus errors.
Even leaves of a tree or something in the distance may give inaccurate
results. So check by focusing on things between 4 to 6 feet away and on
things that have good contrast.

But, there will be times that the focus will be slightly off but not
like before. It is the nature of mechanical things which have tolerances
built into them. In order for the lens to turn freely to focus, there is
a little play so it doesn't bind. But that should be very minimal and
occurs in all DSLR camera systems including Nikon and Canon.

When doing the test use good lighting so that camera shake does not
enter. You might even use flash to more easily see the differences in
focus accuracy because you can use a lower iso. Use aperature preferred
setting at 1.4. Don’t use ADI flash.

After saying all that, the wosses out there will still shake in their
boots and either put up with the poor focus or send it off to Sony. I
suppose if it is under warranty you might want to send it in but beware
that repair personal occasionally drop things and the shippers are not
perfect.

By the way all your lenses will be in registration when the alignment is
done properly. Some people have thought that only one or another lens
had the proble. A dim lens (small aperture ~ F6.3) or wide angle will
not notice the change that the 50mm 1.4 will. But when focus is dead on
for the 1.4 or 1.7 - all your lenses will be dead on unless you have a
defective lens with a loose element etc.

My father was noted for saying that a "faint heart never won nuthin".
The older I get the smarter I have come to realize he was. Happiness
awaits you as it happened for me after 2 years of thumping my fingers on
the table trying to decide what to do about FF. I hope this was helpful
both to you and anyone else who has the problem.


Ivan Lee

  • Trade Count: (11)
  • Membro Ativo
  • ***
  • Mensagens: 861
  • Sexo: Masculino
Resposta #1 Online: 23 de Abril de 2008, 00:48:34
É isso ai! é por isso que o AF da Minolta e Nikon sempre foram mais precisos que o da Canon...
Como na Minolta/Sony e Nikon o AF fica no corpo, basta um ajuste desses no corpo para que algum problema de BF/FF desapareça.

Agora na Canon eu sempre tive problemas... tinha lente que dava front focus, tinha lente que não dava... eu sei que da pra fazer a mesma coisa num corpo Canon, parece que tem um parafuso perto do espelho, e eu tava prestes a regula-lo para ver se iria acabar com os meus problemas de front focus... lembro que na época foi o Leo que não deixou eu fazer rsrs

Ainda bem que eu abandonei Canon e fui pra Minolta, hoje Sony... agora os problemas de foco são coisa do passado  :)
Sony Alpha A77 e Alpha A550 - Tamron 17-50 f/2.8 - Minolta 35 f/2 - Sony 50 f/1.4 - Minolta 28-70 f/2.8G - Sony 70-300 f/4.5-5.6 G SSM - Carl Zeiss 135 f/1.8


Pictus

  • Trade Count: (3)
  • Referência
  • *****
  • Mensagens: 9.109
  • Sexo: Masculino
    • http://www.flickr.com/photos/10986424@N02/sets/
Resposta #2 Online: 23 de Abril de 2008, 18:03:52
Este cara aqui passou de uma 40D para uma A200! :shock:
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1037&message=26929643


Leandro Federsoni

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Colaborador(a)
  • ****
  • Mensagens: 4.974
  • Sexo: Masculino
Resposta #3 Online: 23 de Abril de 2008, 18:27:30
Este cara aqui passou de uma 40D para uma A200! :shock:
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1037&message=26929643

Pictus,

Muitas vezes o orçamento aperta...rs.

Neste caso ele fez uma boa escolha... :ok:

Valeu


Leo Terra

  • SysOp
  • Trade Count: (27)
  • Referência
  • *****
  • Mensagens: 13.759
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • “Deus disse: 'Haja luz'. E houve luz.” (Gen 1,3)
    • http://www.leoterra.com.br
Resposta #4 Online: 23 de Abril de 2008, 19:02:02
Ivan esse ajuste é no sensor de AF, não muda nada o motor ser no corpo ou na lente, o sensor de AF sempre fica na câmera.
O AF de ninkon e minolta são mais precisos porque são mais bem feitos e possuem sistemas melhor elaborados, o motor no corpo só tem a vantagem de que você não fica sugeito a problemas no sistema de parada do motor da lente, se o motor da câmera estiver bom você pode colocar qualquer câmera, no caso de câmeras com motor na lente pode ser que o motor da lente não esteja 100%, ai você pode ter problemas específicos com as lentes. ;)
Leo Terra

CURSOS DE FOTOGRAFIA: www.teiadoconhecimento.com



ATENÇÃO: NÃO RESPONDO DÚVIDAS EM PRIVATIVO. USEM O ESPAÇO PÚBLICO PARA TAL.
PARA DÚVIDAS SOBRE O FÓRUM LEIA O FAQ.


MateusZF

  • Trade Count: (1)
  • Colaborador(a)
  • ****
  • Mensagens: 3.416
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • Você vê o mundo com a sua lente interior.
Resposta #5 Online: 23 de Abril de 2008, 19:20:17
Já que estão falando em motor.
Ontem fiz umas fotos em longa novamente e esquecí o SteadyShot ligado, notei um pequeno barulho enquanto ela capturava a imagem. Um tipo de zunido - SteadyShot trabalhando? Será?
 
Minha máquina fotográfica e prolongamento natural do meu braço.
Foto é algo que depende de uma certa visão... De quem fotografa, de quem vê e de quem interpreta...

www.ribeiraopreto.sp.gov.br
http://www.meadiciona.com/mateuszf


Leo Terra

  • SysOp
  • Trade Count: (27)
  • Referência
  • *****
  • Mensagens: 13.759
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • “Deus disse: 'Haja luz'. E houve luz.” (Gen 1,3)
    • http://www.leoterra.com.br
Resposta #6 Online: 23 de Abril de 2008, 19:26:09
É sim Mateus, pode ficar tranqüilo que é normal, o SSS é meio violento rs.
Leo Terra

CURSOS DE FOTOGRAFIA: www.teiadoconhecimento.com



ATENÇÃO: NÃO RESPONDO DÚVIDAS EM PRIVATIVO. USEM O ESPAÇO PÚBLICO PARA TAL.
PARA DÚVIDAS SOBRE O FÓRUM LEIA O FAQ.


Ivan Lee

  • Trade Count: (11)
  • Membro Ativo
  • ***
  • Mensagens: 861
  • Sexo: Masculino
Resposta #7 Online: 24 de Abril de 2008, 13:52:34
Ivan esse ajuste é no sensor de AF, não muda nada o motor ser no corpo ou na lente, o sensor de AF sempre fica na câmera.
O AF de ninkon e minolta são mais precisos porque são mais bem feitos e possuem sistemas melhor elaborados, o motor no corpo só tem a vantagem de que você não fica sugeito a problemas no sistema de parada do motor da lente, se o motor da câmera estiver bom você pode colocar qualquer câmera, no caso de câmeras com motor na lente pode ser que o motor da lente não esteja 100%, ai você pode ter problemas específicos com as lentes. ;)

hehe vc lembra naquela época que eu tava com problemas na XT? foi no forum FotografiaBrasil ou Brfoto, não lembro ao certo... mas eu tinha problemas com algumas lentes e outras não... e eu tava prestes a mexer no controle do AF... ai acho q foi vc mesmo que me alertou pra não fazer isso rsrs

Eu não entendo isso até hoje... as Sigmas erravam feio no foco, mas tb não era um problema da lente, pq eu levei as lentes num tecnico que todo mundo recomenda no Rio, e ele disse que não havia problema na lente... sendo que tb não havia problema na XT... então eu deduzi que era uma incompatibilidade entre Canon e Sigma...

Sendo que, até minha 50 1.8 Canon dava front focus... mas nenhuma lente "L" dava problema de foco.

Isso me tirava o sono legal...
Sony Alpha A77 e Alpha A550 - Tamron 17-50 f/2.8 - Minolta 35 f/2 - Sony 50 f/1.4 - Minolta 28-70 f/2.8G - Sony 70-300 f/4.5-5.6 G SSM - Carl Zeiss 135 f/1.8


Leo Terra

  • SysOp
  • Trade Count: (27)
  • Referência
  • *****
  • Mensagens: 13.759
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • “Deus disse: 'Haja luz'. E houve luz.” (Gen 1,3)
    • http://www.leoterra.com.br
Resposta #8 Online: 24 de Abril de 2008, 15:50:03
Então Ivan, basicamente é o seguinte, o sistema de AF é composto por vários itens, mas basicamente é o módulo de cálculo, o sensor, e o motor de AF, o sensor e o módulo de cálculo ficam sempre na câmera, o que difere alguns equipamentos é que a lente pode ou não ter o motor dentro dela, se o problema ocorre em algumas lentes e em outras não fica claro então que o problema não está no módulo de cálculo e nem no sensor (que é o que é ajustado nesse caso) e sim no alinhamento dos elementos óticos da lente ou no motor de AF. O que vejo nas sigma é que muitas delas tem sérios problemas de controle de qualidade, muitos dos problemas do tipo estão relacionados à precisão do motor de AF e se tornam mais graves conforme nos afastamos do objeto a ser focado (a sensibilidade à distância é bem maior). :)
Leo Terra

CURSOS DE FOTOGRAFIA: www.teiadoconhecimento.com



ATENÇÃO: NÃO RESPONDO DÚVIDAS EM PRIVATIVO. USEM O ESPAÇO PÚBLICO PARA TAL.
PARA DÚVIDAS SOBRE O FÓRUM LEIA O FAQ.


Mauricio11

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Conhecendo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 43
  • Sexo: Masculino
Resposta #9 Online: 28 de Abril de 2008, 11:26:14
Eu tinha Backfocus na minha A100.

Eu mesmo ajustei e posso dizer que a maquina ficou perfeita.
Mesmo com aberturas 1.4, o foco está superpreciso.
Mas esse ajuste não é para qualquer um. Tem de ter sangue frio e muita precisão nas mãos.

Veja meu post e a continuação da discussão no link abaixo:
http://www.dyxum.com/dforum/forum_posts.asp?TID=23251

Abs.