Autor Tópico: Fujifilm OCMOS - O Sensor orgânico da Fuji.  (Lida 10774 vezes)

Leo Terra

  • SysOp
  • Trade Count: (27)
  • Referência
  • *****
  • Mensagens: 13.764
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • “Deus disse: 'Haja luz'. E houve luz.” (Gen 1,3)
    • http://www.leoterra.com.br
Online: 17 de Setembro de 2006, 15:03:18
Bom pessoal, para quem se interessa pelo sensor orgânico da Fuji eu juntei um pouco de material hoje para postar informações para que você possam ver o que está por vir. Eu sempre falo a respeito, mas ainda não tinha tido tempo de juntar um material legal dar de referência, como a curiosidade sobre a informação sempre foi grande eu dediquei um tempinho hoje a coletar essas informações.

Primeiro o mais importante... A patente:
http://appft1.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser...AND+20050205958

Agora as notícias a respeito, depois que o sensor foi apresentado operacional na PMA de 2006.

http://www.letsgodigital.org/en/2006/fujif...or/review1.html
Citar
Fujifilm CMOS Organic Image Sensor
Mark Peters : 2006-04-19 08:45:00   
 
Fujifilm CMOS Organic Image Sensor : FujiFilm Japan has developed a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor using an organic photoelectric conversion film, and successfully captured a monochrome image with it. A previous laboratory-level success in photographing with an organic photoelectric conversion film was made in combination with an imaging tube, by the Science & Technical Research Laboratories of Japan Broadcasting Corp. Instead of a CMOS circuit, however, that example used a 10cm-long imaging tube. Fuji Photo Film has encapsulated the organic photoelectric conversion film with a signal read circuit into a semiconductor package, making it much easier than an imaging tube to use in a compact consumer camera.

http://www.letsgodigital.org/en/news/artic...story_7341.html
Citar
Fujifilm CMOS Organic Image Sensor
Mark Peters : April 19th 2006 - 08:45 CET 
            
 
Fujifilm CMOS Organic Image Sensor : FujiFilm Japan has developed a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor using an organic photoelectric conversion film, and successfully captured a monochrome image with it. A previous laboratory-level success in photographing with an organic photoelectric conversion film was made in combination with an imaging tube, by the Science & Technical Research Laboratories of Japan Broadcasting Corp. Instead of a CMOS circuit, however, that example used a 10cm-long imaging tube. Fuji Photo Film has encapsulated the organic photoelectric conversion film with a signal read circuit into a semiconductor package, making it much easier than an imaging tube to use in a compact consumer camera.
 
Fujifilm Organic Image Sensor
Fuji Photo Film announced the research results at the IS&T / SPIE Electronic Imaging Science and Technology conference held in the USA. This marks the first disclosure of concrete research work by the firm. In addition to being a leading developer of charge-coupled devices (CCD) and digital cameras, the company also has extensive experience in the development of silver nitrate film and the organic dyes used in organic photoelectric conversion films. Research and development in the field is likely to accelerate now that Fuji Photo Film has started work on an organic CMOS sensor, claimed by some to be the ideal imaging device.

Greater effect on image brightness information
The company did not discuss when the organic CMOS sensor might be commercialized. The development does represent a major step forward, however, in that an actual image was output using a standard signal read circuit and a green organic photoelectric conversion film. Compared to blue or red, green has a greater effect on image brightness information. Future development efforts seem likely to concentrate on process technology, finding ways to make the organic photoelectric conversion films flat and free of foreign matter.

Organic CMOS sensor - Saving Light
The reason the organic CMOS sensor has been referred to as the ideal imaging sensor is its structure. Existing imaging devices extract only specific wavelengths, using color filters, and convert them to charges. In the green image, for example, blue and red light is discarded. The organic CMOS sensor, however, uses all visible light thanks to a vertical stack of organic photoelectric conversion film. The per-pixel optical utilization is tripled, making it possible that sensitivity would be significantly higher than that of existing imagers.

Fuji film Photo Green organic CMOS sensor
CMOS sensors with photoelectric converters for each color aligned vertically have already been commercialized by Foveon Inc of the US. The wavelength sensitivity of each converter is fairly low, however, making it necessary to use special image processing before accurate colors can be obtained. The green organic CMOS sensor from Fuji Photo Film, on the other hand, offers wavelength selectivity close to that of silver nitrate film. A source at the firm explained, "We applied the organic colorant technology gained through our work in silver nitrate film and other products." Evaluation results for the red and blue organic photoelectric conversion films were not presented.

High aperture ratios
Organic CMOS sensors are likely to also offer advantages in terms of aperture ratio (the portion of each pixel actually used for photoelectric conversion) and cost reduction. The aperture ratio of Fuji Photo Film's prototype is said to be close to 100%, which means no microlenses would be needed and costs could be reduced. Organic CMOS sensors have high aperture ratios because the photoelectric conversion film is the first thing the incoming light encounters, with the signal read circuit behind it. In existing CMOS sensors, the photoelectric converter is partially obscured by the signal read circuit.

Organic photoelectric conversion film
The organic photoelectric conversion film developed by Fuji Photo Film also appears to be on a par with existing imaging devices when it comes to quantization efficiency. The quantization efficiency of the organic photoelectric conversion film that made the image in Fig 1a was only about 10%, but a 30% efficiency has been achieved in the lab. Existing imaging devices generally run at about 40%.


http://neasia.nikkeibp.com/neasia/003820
Citar
Fuji Film's Success with Organic Imaging Sensor

Fuji Photo Film Co Ltd of Japan has developed a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor using an organic photoelectric conversion film, and successfully captured a monochrome image with it (Fig 1). A previous laboratory-level success in photographing with an organic photoelectric conversion film was made in combination with an imaging tube, by the Science & Technical Research Laboratories of Japan Broadcasting Corp (NHK) of Japan. Instead of a CMOS circuit, however, that example used a 10cm-long imaging tube. Fuji Photo Film has encapsulated the organic photoelectric conversion film with a signal read circuit (made with CMOS technology) into a semiconductor package, making it much easier than an imaging tube to use in a compact consumer camera.

Fuji Photo Film announced the research results at the IS&T/SPIE Electronic Imaging Science & Technology conference held in the US on January 18, 2006. This marks the first disclosure of concrete research work by the firm. In addition to being a leading developer of charge-coupled devices (CCD) and digital cameras, the company also has extensive experience in the development of silver nitrate film and the organic dyes used in organic photoelectric conversion films. Research and development in the field is likely to accelerate now that Fuji Photo Film has started work on an organic CMOS sensor, claimed by some to be the ideal imaging device.

The company did not discuss when the organic CMOS sensor might be commercialized. The development does represent a major step forward, however, in that an actual image was output using a standard signal read circuit and a green organic photoelectric conversion film (Fig 2). Compared to blue or red, green has a greater effect on image brightness information. Future development efforts seem likely to concentrate on process technology, finding ways to make the organic photoelectric conversion films flat and free of foreign matter.

Saving Light
The reason the organic CMOS sensor has been referred to as the ideal imaging sensor is its structure. Existing imaging devices extract only specific wavelengths, using color filters, and convert them to charges. In the green image, for example, blue and red light is discarded. The organic CMOS sensor, however, uses all visible light thanks to a vertical stack of organic photoelectric conversion films (Fig 3, p53). The per-pixel optical utilization is tripled, making it possible that sensitivity would be significantly higher than that of existing imagers.

CMOS sensors with photoelectric converters for each color aligned vertically have already been commercialized by Foveon Inc of the US. The wavelength sensitivity of each converter is fairly low, however, making it necessary to use special image processing before accurate colors can be obtained. The green organic CMOS sensor from Fuji Photo Film, on the other hand, offers wavelength selectivity close to that of silver nitrate film. A source at the firm explained, "We applied the organic colorant technology gained through our work in silver nitrate film and other products." Evaluation results for the red and blue organic photoelectric conversion films were not presented.

Organic CMOS sensors are likely to also offer advantages in terms of aperture ratio (the portion of each pixel actually used for photoelectric conversion) and cost reduction. The aperture ratio of Fuji Photo Film's prototype is said to be close to 100%, which means no microlenses would be needed and costs could be reduced. Organic CMOS sensors have high aperture ratios because the photoelectric conversion film is the first thing the incoming light encounters, with the signal read circuit behind it. In existing CMOS sensors, the photoelectric converter is partially obscured by the signal read circuit.
The organic photoelectric conversion film developed by Fuji Photo Film also appears to be on a par with existing imaging devices when it comes to quantization efficiency. The quantization efficiency of the organic photoelectric conversion film that made the image in Fig 1a was only about 10%, but a 30% efficiency has been achieved in the lab. Existing imaging devices generally run at about 40%.

by Tomohiro Otsuki

(April 2006 Issue, Nikkei Electronics Asia)


http://www.ephotozine.com/news/fullnews.cfm?NewsID=2833
Citar
Prototype Fujifilm sensor is three times more sensitive than current sensors (06:27:28 - 24th Mar 06)  
The new sensor uses a similar concept to the Foveon sensor. Different layers of light sensitive material react to each primary colour of light at each photosite, resulting in greater colour depth.



No formal statement has been made about exact specifications of the new sensor, although Fujifilm UK Marketing Manager, Wills Rolls has confirmed the technology is in it's early stages of development adding, "Fujifilm are looking to lead the pack when it comes to sensor technology."

The new sensor technology is reported to consist of three layers of organic pigments, each separately reacting to red, green and blue light. The layers are sandwiched between transparent electrodes from which electric current flows when light enters the corresponding pigment layer.

Fujifilm has already made a prototype image sensor using a pigment that reacts to green light. It produces monochrome pictures with the same depth as colour photographic film and is three times more sensitive than current digital image sensors. Work has already started on making prototype elements for the red and blue layers as well.

A patent has already been filed for the technology, and Fujifilm hope that it will be available in three to four years.

Bom espero que gostem do materialzinho e que de para vcs já imaginarem o que está por vir. :)
« Última modificação: 17 de Setembro de 2006, 15:11:23 por Leo Terra »
Leo Terra

CURSOS DE FOTOGRAFIA: www.teiadoconhecimento.com



ATENÇÃO: NÃO RESPONDO DÚVIDAS EM PRIVATIVO. USEM O ESPAÇO PÚBLICO PARA TAL.
PARA DÚVIDAS SOBRE O FÓRUM LEIA O FAQ.


Leandro Federsoni

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Colaborador(a)
  • ****
  • Mensagens: 4.974
  • Sexo: Masculino
Resposta #1 Online: 17 de Setembro de 2006, 15:20:28
Interessante, mas acredito que uma boa parte das vantagens deste sensor Fuji já estaremos vendo brevemente na Sigma SD14.

Você concorda?
 


Leo Terra

  • SysOp
  • Trade Count: (27)
  • Referência
  • *****
  • Mensagens: 13.764
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • “Deus disse: 'Haja luz'. E houve luz.” (Gen 1,3)
    • http://www.leoterra.com.br
Resposta #2 Online: 17 de Setembro de 2006, 15:30:27
Não, o princípio de funcionamento do FOVEON é diferente, na verdade o FOVEON é um CMOS com algumas dificuldades em termos de saturação e principalmente ruído.
A única vantagem similar é a questão de não sofrer demosaico, mas o FOVEON tem que trabalhar com resoluções bem mais baixas do que um sensor convencional para não estourar uma ruideira absurda nele.
A tecnologia orgânica é totalmente diferente (a propósito a Fuji tem trabalhado muito com tecnologia orgânica para várias aplicações), o rendimento dela é absurdamente mais alto do que das tecnologias inorgânicas, ela consegue HOJE trabalhar com mais de 3 vezes menos ruído do que as tecnologias inorgânicas mais eficientes do mercado, viabilizando resoluções bem mais altas e em 3 layers, a latitude e os níveis de saturação também são bem mais altos, isso porque o sensor ainda trabalha a 10% de rendimento, porém já conseguiram rendimento de 30% em laboratório..
Com essa tecnologia em 2008 devemos estar vendo sensores APS de 22MP de 3 layers (o que equivaleria a aproximadamente 44MP de bayer em termos de nitidez), com aproximadamente 17 pontos de latitude em RAW e menos ruído em ISO 1600 do que uma Canon 5D em ISO 400 hoje, enquanto o FOVEON que deve ser lançado hoje difilmente deverá passar dos 6MP em 3 layers.

Eu creio que é um cenário bem interessante que esse sensor deverá proporcionar. Fora que a habilidade de identificar a luminância deverá proporcionar imagens P&B similares ao filme, o que hoje requer muito esforço de software. :)
« Última modificação: 28 de Abril de 2007, 00:53:41 por Leo Terra »
Leo Terra

CURSOS DE FOTOGRAFIA: www.teiadoconhecimento.com



ATENÇÃO: NÃO RESPONDO DÚVIDAS EM PRIVATIVO. USEM O ESPAÇO PÚBLICO PARA TAL.
PARA DÚVIDAS SOBRE O FÓRUM LEIA O FAQ.


Leo Terra

  • SysOp
  • Trade Count: (27)
  • Referência
  • *****
  • Mensagens: 13.764
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • “Deus disse: 'Haja luz'. E houve luz.” (Gen 1,3)
    • http://www.leoterra.com.br
Resposta #3 Online: 17 de Setembro de 2006, 15:31:57
LEandro eu tenho um amigo que é engenheiro químico na Honeywell.
Leo Terra

CURSOS DE FOTOGRAFIA: www.teiadoconhecimento.com



ATENÇÃO: NÃO RESPONDO DÚVIDAS EM PRIVATIVO. USEM O ESPAÇO PÚBLICO PARA TAL.
PARA DÚVIDAS SOBRE O FÓRUM LEIA O FAQ.


Leandro Federsoni

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Colaborador(a)
  • ****
  • Mensagens: 4.974
  • Sexo: Masculino
Resposta #4 Online: 17 de Setembro de 2006, 16:53:30
Pelos números que você acredita ser alcançáveis, nós teremos um cenário de mercado não muito bom, principalmente para quem vive em países emergentes, pois ou a concorrencia vai ter que correr muito atrás destes sensores, ou não estaremos vivos para ter dinheiro suficiente para comprar esta tecnologia. E olha que nestas reportagens estão dizendo em uma possível redução de custo com estes sensores orgânicos.

Qual o nome do seu amigo? O meu site fica em Guarulhos e em Alphavile.
« Última modificação: 17 de Setembro de 2006, 16:56:21 por lfedersoni »


Leo Terra

  • SysOp
  • Trade Count: (27)
  • Referência
  • *****
  • Mensagens: 13.764
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • “Deus disse: 'Haja luz'. E houve luz.” (Gen 1,3)
    • http://www.leoterra.com.br
Resposta #5 Online: 17 de Setembro de 2006, 18:19:33
O cenário que eu vejo é de revolução cara, esse sensor me cheira a revolução vivida com os X86 na computação...

Ele chama Raoni Ciasca, está em São Luiz - MA.
Leo Terra

CURSOS DE FOTOGRAFIA: www.teiadoconhecimento.com



ATENÇÃO: NÃO RESPONDO DÚVIDAS EM PRIVATIVO. USEM O ESPAÇO PÚBLICO PARA TAL.
PARA DÚVIDAS SOBRE O FÓRUM LEIA O FAQ.


GMarigo

  • Trade Count: (1)
  • Membro Ativo
  • ***
  • Mensagens: 980
    • http://
Resposta #6 Online: 18 de Setembro de 2006, 11:25:15
Que bom que estou comprando lentes Nikon agora...  :rolleyes:  
[[span style=\'color:gray\']gabrielmarigo[span style=\'color:red\']][/font][/span][/span]


TheRipper

  • Trade Count: (7)
  • Membro Ativo
  • ***
  • Mensagens: 860
    • http://
Resposta #7 Online: 18 de Setembro de 2006, 15:10:34
Citar
Que bom que estou comprando lentes Nikon agora...  :rolleyes:
Será que Canon e Sony não irão correr atrás do prejuízo?  :denken:  
Fábio Garcia - Rio de Janeiro

Flickr


GMarigo

  • Trade Count: (1)
  • Membro Ativo
  • ***
  • Mensagens: 980
    • http://
Resposta #8 Online: 18 de Setembro de 2006, 15:16:39
Se a Sony correr, vai acabar parando no corpo das Nikon tb (ou não).
[[span style=\'color:gray\']gabrielmarigo[span style=\'color:red\']][/font][/span][/span]


Leo Terra

  • SysOp
  • Trade Count: (27)
  • Referência
  • *****
  • Mensagens: 13.764
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • “Deus disse: 'Haja luz'. E houve luz.” (Gen 1,3)
    • http://www.leoterra.com.br
Resposta #9 Online: 18 de Setembro de 2006, 15:17:27
Duvido que não corram, o problema é que a Fuji tem trabalhado com tecnologia orgânica a mais de 15 anos e tem um departamento exclusivo para isso, eles fizeram em 2004 um DVD que não usa metal, só elementos orgânicos e que dura muito mais do que o DVD convencional, agora veio esse sensor... Enquanto todo mundo se mantinha trabalhando apenas com elementos inorgânicos a Fuji a 15 anos apostou diferente.
Agora vai dar trabalho para todo mundo, porque terão que tirar um atraso de 15 anos e ainda enfrentar várias barreiras de patentes, a parte boa é que eles devem fazer isso em menos de 15 anos, porque o mais difícil que é a idéia eles já terão uma base ao fazer engenharia reversa do produto da Fuji... :)
Eu sinto cheiro de revolução no ar, como nos tempos do X86, no começo um fabricante dominará pela novidade, mas em pouco tempo a tendência deverá ser seguida. :)
Gabriel ninguém sabe direito o futuro da Nikon sobre sensores, hoje a fornecedora é a Sony, mas as políticas de concorrência da Sony são meio prejudiciais para quem usa seus sensores, acredito que a Nikon deva estar analisando muito bem quem poderia se tornar um fornecedor confiável, nesse ponto acho que duas empresas tem chances, Fuji e Kodak.
« Última modificação: 18 de Setembro de 2006, 15:19:11 por Leo Terra »
Leo Terra

CURSOS DE FOTOGRAFIA: www.teiadoconhecimento.com



ATENÇÃO: NÃO RESPONDO DÚVIDAS EM PRIVATIVO. USEM O ESPAÇO PÚBLICO PARA TAL.
PARA DÚVIDAS SOBRE O FÓRUM LEIA O FAQ.


Alex Biologo

  • Trade Count: (4)
  • Colaborador(a)
  • ****
  • Mensagens: 3.802
  • Sexo: Masculino
    • Olhares Dispersos
Resposta #10 Online: 18 de Setembro de 2006, 15:32:41
Leo, o ideal seria a Nikon covnencer a Fuji, não? afinal já existe um acordo nos corpos da S3, a Nikon ganharia mais que a Fuji com o acordo, mas poderia render muita grana aos dois...
Alex Martins dos Santos - São Paulo/SP
Fuji S5100
Pentax MZ-50
Canon 10D e 300D + lente  28-135 is Canon + lente 70-300 TAmron


Leo Terra

  • SysOp
  • Trade Count: (27)
  • Referência
  • *****
  • Mensagens: 13.764
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • “Deus disse: 'Haja luz'. E houve luz.” (Gen 1,3)
    • http://www.leoterra.com.br
Resposta #11 Online: 18 de Setembro de 2006, 17:30:01
A verdade é que a Nikon é uma ervilha do lado da Fuji, a Fuji é muito maior que a Nikon, então teria que ser nesse rumo mesmo, da Nikon convencer ou Fuji ou Kodak a fornecerem sensores, eu como executivo acharia a Fuji o caminho mais fácil, porque ela não fornece para ninguém, já a Kodak fornece para bastante gente, até Panasonic/Leica estão comprando tecnologia Kodak... Mas vai caber ao corpo de executivos da Nikon e como decisões do tipo nem sempre são lógicas (porque envolvem muito $$$ que não sabemos para que lado está indo) fica complicado fazer futurologia em cima disso. :/
Leo Terra

CURSOS DE FOTOGRAFIA: www.teiadoconhecimento.com



ATENÇÃO: NÃO RESPONDO DÚVIDAS EM PRIVATIVO. USEM O ESPAÇO PÚBLICO PARA TAL.
PARA DÚVIDAS SOBRE O FÓRUM LEIA O FAQ.


GMarigo

  • Trade Count: (1)
  • Membro Ativo
  • ***
  • Mensagens: 980
    • http://
Resposta #12 Online: 18 de Setembro de 2006, 18:04:35
Resumindo, comprando vidro nikon vc se garante para uma S5 ou uma D400  :rolleyes:  
[[span style=\'color:gray\']gabrielmarigo[span style=\'color:red\']][/font][/span][/span]


Leandro Federsoni

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Colaborador(a)
  • ****
  • Mensagens: 4.974
  • Sexo: Masculino
Resposta #13 Online: 27 de Maio de 2010, 15:02:44
Uma notinha sobre o sensor orgânico...pelo jeito vai demorar um pouco pra ser lançado.
http://techon.nikkeibp.co.jp/english/NEWS_EN/20100526/182953/


Leo Terra

  • SysOp
  • Trade Count: (27)
  • Referência
  • *****
  • Mensagens: 13.764
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • “Deus disse: 'Haja luz'. E houve luz.” (Gen 1,3)
    • http://www.leoterra.com.br
Resposta #14 Online: 27 de Maio de 2010, 16:16:45
Leandro será que é a mesma tecnologia da Fuji?
A Fuji tinha planos de tornar comercial no final de 2008. Mas ela se complicou bastante no mercado fotográfico de 2006 para cá.
Leo Terra

CURSOS DE FOTOGRAFIA: www.teiadoconhecimento.com



ATENÇÃO: NÃO RESPONDO DÚVIDAS EM PRIVATIVO. USEM O ESPAÇO PÚBLICO PARA TAL.
PARA DÚVIDAS SOBRE O FÓRUM LEIA O FAQ.